Projects

Projects about Prisons, Probation and Community Justice

Nothing to See Here? 15 years of FAI determinations for deaths in custody

A research team based at the University of Glasgow has investigated 196 Fatal Accident Inquiries (FAI) that were held as a result of a death in custody. The research papers and associated materials were produced by (Hon Prof) Linda Allan, Stuart Allan, Professor Sarah Armstrong, Betsy Barkas and Dr Deborah Kinnear. The aim of the project is to identify patterns in FAI processes and outcomes to...

Scotland in Lockdown

The “Health and social impacts of Covid-19 in Scotland” study aims to understand how the response to Covid-19 including lockdown measures is affecting those who may already have been isolated or excluded. The research, commissioned by the Chief Scientist Office, is organised into four work streams for each of these isolated or excluded populations; 1. Disabilities and long-term health...

Concepts of Community: Exploring ‘Community’ in Theory, Policy and Practice Imaginaries

In this SCCJR funded project, researchers are exploring and developing concepts of community and how these are used in research, policy and practice. The conceptualisation and definition of community has been at the centre of ongoing discussion (Cohen, 1989; Day, 2006). The persistent question ‘what is community?’, or ‘how might a community differ from the community?’ have prompted many...

The Scottish Prisons Commission: Ten Years On

In July 2008 The Scottish Prisons Commission (also known as the McLeish Commission) published its report Scotland’s Choice. This report culminated an eight month investigation of how Scotland uses prison and the range of factors that drive this, from inequality in society to arrest and sentencing practices. The report contained 23 recommendations covering an almost unprecedented range of...

Punishing Spaces, Working Spaces: Artist in Residence at SCCJR

In this Leverhulme Trust funded residency (February – November 2012), photographer Jenny Wicks was in residence at SCCJR for ten months. This artistic-academic collaboration aims to bring into view the researcher rather than the sometimes sensational topics of their study. Placing the criminologist at the scene of the crime allows for the exploration of key boundaries: between innocent and...