News

Announcing the Scottish Justice Fellows

19 Nov 2018

Winners of Scottish Justice Fellowships Announced

FIVE PhD students have become the first recipients of a Scottish Justice Fellowship which will seem them turn their theses into research summaries and associated materials for policy makers and practitioners.

We are delighted to announce the Fellows: Emma Forbes, Kirsty Deacon and Annie Crowley (all University of Glasgow), Shane Horgan (University of Edinburgh) and Fern Gillon (University of Strathclyde). The Fellows will be covering topics including cybercrime and security, domestic abuse, imprisonment’s impact on families, early intervention in youth justice, and working with at risk young women.

They will each receive £3,000 in funding and mentoring support throughout their six-month fellowship.

The Scottish Justice Fellowships are a unique initiative funded by the Scottish Government in partnership with the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) and the Scottish Institute for Policing Research (SIPR). The main purpose of the fellowships is to put academic research into action through innovative means including textual, visual and audio materials.

Cabinet Secretary for Justice Humza Yousaf said:

“The Scottish Government is committed to ensuring that the best available evidence can inform our policy and decision-making and I recognise the important contribution that academic research can make to this process.

“I am delighted we are working with academic partners on this innovative project to help draw on previously untapped PhD research that can inform our work to strengthen Scotland’s justice system and help keep communities safe.”

Sarah Armstrong, Director of the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, said: “We are excited by this opportunity that puts research to work. PhDs represent years of intensive study, and too often sit on a library shelf. This initiative brings the latest research to bear on problems of real concern, developing evidence that can inform policy and practice, and contribute to building just societies.”

Liz Aston, Director of the Scottish Institute for Policing Research said “We are delighted to support this venture, which will enhance knowledge exchange, contribute to the development of evidence informed practice and policy making, and support the development of early career researchers.”