Punishment and Society: Politics & Culture

Why do societies punish as they do? What drives change in styles and levels of punishment over
time? How do penalties become, or cease to be, acceptable? What is at stake, morally and
politically, in the responses we give to questions such as these? Do the answers lie mainly in the
domain of politics, where ideas and decisions are debated and changed, sometimes rapidly? Or do
they relate to deeper and more lasting aspects of our cultures?

This event brings together a number of leading contemporary thinkers on these questions with a
view to refining and redefining our agendas for research and intervention.

Speakers include: David Garland, Loїc Wacquant, Shadd Maruna, Lesley McAra, Fergus McNeill

Conference Rate £120 (full rate), £40 (postgraduates)

Conference delegates are also invited to attend (at no extra charge):

· The Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research Annual lecture, entitled ‘Restoring
Legitimacy to American Prisons (the view from Castle Rock)’ by Jonathan Simon (11 May
2011)
· GERN ‘interlab’ on ‘Civic criminologies for late-modern societies’ (13 May 2011). Speakers
include Ian Loader and Richard Sparks, Alison Liebling

For further details and to book visit www.lifelong.ed.ac.uk/punishmentandsociety, download flier here.

Any queries contact: arlene.sievwright@ed.ac.uk.