Projects

Active Projects about Evidence, Statistics and Trends

AQMeN

AQMeN is an ESRC funded network of around 1400 people with a shared interest in quantitative methods and who wish to refresh their existing knowledge or learn a range of new skills. The main aim of AQMeN is to build capacity in quantitative expertise amongst the social science community of Scotland. The Network is led by a group of academics from eight of the Scottish Universities and its...

Working Lunches at Ivy Lodge

Working Lunches are held from 12.30pm to 2pm on Wednesdays in the ASRF Meeting Room, 66 Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow.  They provide an informal space in which to discuss research ideas, whether this comes from work in progress, work we are thinking about doing or a common reading. We welcome visitors and have a small budget to offset costs of travel for anyone seeking a forum in which to discuss...

Community Policing in Scotland

This AHRC funded knowledge transfer project runs from Jan 2009 to Dec 2011. It involves working with the Scottish police to interrogate available conceptual models of community policing and develop best practice in Scotland. The project has its own website at http://police.sccjr.ac.uk/ It involves a range of activities and outputs which will be posted to that site through the life of the project.

Comparing Crime Surveys Across the UK

The United Kingdom is covered by three separate crime surveys, the British Crime Survey (which covers England and Wales), the Scottish Crime and Justice Survey and the Northern Ireland Crime Survey. Although these surveys share common origins and have many similarities they have differences which reflect the nature of criminal justice processes and policy interests within the separate...

SCJS User Guide

SCCJR worked in partnership with the Scottish Government to create a “user guide” for researchers who wish to conduct secondary analysis of the Scottish Crime Survey datasets. This guide covered a range of topics, including how to access the data, how to find commonly used variables and how to weight the data prior to analysis. It also included examples of common types of...

Analysing the Scottish Crime Survey Over Time

This work examined how, in the absence of true longitudinal data, responses from different years of the Scottish Crime Survey can be combined to provide an insight into changing underlying patterns of victimisation or attitudes to the criminal justice system in Scotland. This research is currently focussed on the topic of whether changes in the amount of crime reported to the police are a...

Using the Scottish Offenders Index for Research

The Scottish Offenders Index (SOI) has not received the same level of academic interest as the Offenders Index for England and Wales. SCCJR has produced a report looking at what information is held in the SOI and the strengths and limitations of different statistical techniques that could be used to analyse these data. It is anticipated that this initial developmental work will form...

Families of Nations and Criminal Justice Outcomes

There is a long history within Social Policy of identifying groups of countries who share common policy outcomes (typified by the work of Gøsta Esping-Andersen, 1990, and Francis Castles, 1998). This work built on the recent work of Paul Norris (2007) by looking at how the groups of nations identified in other areas of Social Policy may relate to differences in criminal justice...

Scottish Prisons Commission Report

In July 2008, the Scottish Prisons Commission published its report, setting out an ambitious vision of penal reform. Sarah Armstrong and Fergus McNeill acted as academic advisers during the latter stages of the Commission’s work. The report, ‘Scotland’s Choice: Report of the Scottish Prisons Commission’, argued that a nation’s use of prison is partly an expression of...

Scoping Study into Quantitative Methods Capacity Building in Scotland

This scoping study was funded jointly by the Economic and Social Research Council and the Scottish Funding Council. The research was carried out in early 2007 by a multi-disciplinary team based at the University of Edinburgh, led by Susan McVie of the School of Law and SCCJR. The other co-applicants were Professor Anthony Coxon, Honorary Professorial Fellow in the School of Social & Political...

Metaphors in Policy

Metaphors are not merely ornamental, they fundamentally shape how we know things. The use of passive language and particular prepositions when discussing womens’ offending (see the report ‘Women Offenders: A Safer Way’), for example, is the deployment of a metaphor of women as victims. The metaphors used to describe integration of public sector activities, such as...