Projects

Projects about Young People and Youth Justice

The effects of vicarious traumatisation upon those working in the justice system in Scotland

The project will explores the experiences of service providers working with girls and young women who have experienced trauma and victimization. The project, which started in January 2017, is using mixed methods, including interviews and psychometric measures, with 25-30 service providers working in either custodial or community-based settings with girls and young women who are involved with /

Whole System Approach to Children and Young People who Offend

The project funded by the Scottish Government will involve phase one of the evaluation of the implementation of the national Whole System Approach to Children and Young People who Offend. The programme of work on the Whole System Approach will be extended from September 2012 with the appointment of two full-time +3 PhD Studentships (funded through the ESRC/Scottish Government Co-funded...

Reconviction among young people sentenced in the pilot Youth Courts

This project was to assess whether the pilot Youth Courts were more effective in bringing about reductions in recidivism, reconviction among Youth Court cases was compared with reconviction among three other groups of cases: those sentenced in the sheriff summary court and those sentenced in two comparator Sheriff Summary Courts over a similar period of time. The work was requested by the...

Services for Young Runaways: A Scoping Study

This scoping study for the Scottish Coalition for Young Runaways was undertaken to examine responses to young people in Scotland who run away from home or substitute care. The study, originated from concerns about the experiences of young people who run away or are forced to leave where they live and aimed to find out more about the responses currently in place to address the needs of these young...

Youth Violence in Scotland

In November 2009, SCCJR were commissioned by the Scottish Government to identify and collate available qualitative and quantitative research data and information about youth violence in Scotland. The review draws on available sources of data from administrative sources (recorded crime, criminal proceedings, school exclusions, referrals to the Children’s Hearings System) and from the...

A Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Drivers of Perception of Anti-Social Behaviour

This rapid evidence assessment was requested and funded by the Home Office in 2009. Non-SCCJR colleagues John Flint and Sadie Parr were also members of the project team. The report is available here...

Analysis of Supervision Skills by Juvenile Justice Workers

This research, funded by the Australian Criminology Research Council, is examining the nature and effectiveness of different styles of supervision of offenders. The research is being conducted in collaboration with the Department of Juvenile Justice in New South Wales. The study sample will include 50 juvenile justice workers and 200 juvenile justice clients (four clients for each worker). Data...

Evaluation of the Grampian Return Home Welfare Interview (RHWI) pilot

This evaluation examines the operation of Grampian Police RHWI pilot in two pilot areas. The RHWI has been introduced to provide a more effective response to young people who are reported missing either from home or who are looked after and accommodated. The evaluation has been commissioned by the Scottish Government and is due for completion in April 2010. This is a joint evaluation with...

Consensus / Consenso

SCCJR, in collaboration with Xunta de Galicia, Spain and 4 other international partners, were awarded a grant under the European Commission, DG Freedom, Justice and Security: Framework Partnership ‘Prevention of and Fight Against Crime 2007’ for a project identifying, analysing and disseminating existing good practices in restorative juvenile justice across six...

Youth Gangs and Knife Carrying

In 2008, SCCJR were awarded a research grant of £155,000 by the Scottish Government to undertake ethnographic research exploring the nature of youth gang involvement, and the nature of knife carrying by young people in Scotland, and the roles that such activities may play in young peoples’ everyday lives. The research took place in five locations across Scotland and involved a...

Families of Nations and Criminal Justice Outcomes

There is a long history within Social Policy of identifying groups of countries who share common policy outcomes (typified by the work of Gøsta Esping-Andersen, 1990, and Francis Castles, 1998). This work built on the recent work of Paul Norris (2007) by looking at how the groups of nations identified in other areas of Social Policy may relate to differences in criminal justice...

Juvenile Justice in New South Wales

description forthcoming...

Evaluation of the National Parenting Development Project Project (NPDP, Aberlour Child Care Trust).

This was a four year evaluation of the National Parenting Development Project which examined the strategic and direct impact of the project. This involved an examination of the collaborative work between NPDP and the Programmes Unit at HMP and YOI Cornton Vale where a pilot project has been introduced aimed at assisting women prisoners to address issues of separation...

Drinking and Drug Use in the Community: A Survey of Young Offenders, 2007

This project was conducted in collaboration with Bill McKinlay, the Governor of HMP Barlinnie, and staff at Polmont YOI. Data collection builds upon similar surveys conducted by Bill during 1979 and 1996. The Scottish Prison Service published the report of the project in 2009. To view details and download the final report click here.

Cultural Change in Community Justice

SCCJR was commissioned by the Scottish Government to prepare a brief literature review which explores cultural change in community justice. This is intended to inform the ongoing work of a Performance Improvement Strategy Group which is trying to develop the effectiveness and quality of criminal justice social work in Scotland, as part of the Reducing Reoffending agenda. The basic idea is...

Desistance and Reducing Reoffending

Desistance from crime – the process through which people cease and refrain from offending – is a research topic that is of significant import for criminal justice policy and practice. Staff of the SCCJR have already made a number of contributions to debates about how policy and practice could and should respond to the findings of desistance research. For...