AQMeN guest lecture: The social origins of adolescents’ anticipated shame and guilt feelings in delinquent situations

“Young people should be prone to the feeling of shame because they live by feeling and therefore commit many errors, but are restrained by shame” – Aristotle.

Recent research agrees with Aristotle’s assessment, since emotions such as shame and guilt not only give us moral feedback after transgressive behaviour, they can also prevent people from offending. That is, individuals often anticipate emotional outcomes when considering alternative lines of action and try to avoid painful emotions. This seminar will deal with two obvious questions raised by these findings: In what sense are shame and guilt important for understanding why youngsters do or don’t offend?  Why do some adolescents anticipate stronger feelings of shame and guilt in delinquent situations than others?

Postgraduate researcher Arne De Boeck is visiting from the University of Leuven and will be speaking about his research on the social origins of adolescents’ anticipated shame and guilt feelings in delinquent situations.

Arne will present the first results of a quantitative study in which several hypotheses on the differences in adolescents’ anticipated shame-guilt feelings in delinquent situations were tested. The sample was collected in Genk, a multi-ethnic city in which a secularized catholic majority lives side by side with a Muslim minority.

NB This is a rescheduled date.